Susan McCracken

ARCHITECTURAL ARTWORKS


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THE ARTIST

"Everywhere you look, there is color and light. I guess that’s why l’m always inspired.  Stained glass is one of the oldest art forms.  It thrived under the belief it could illuminate the mind – and it’s certainly had that effect on me." Susan McCracken

Susan McCracken is a glass artist.  Her work adorns homes and business all over the USA, with clients who range from neighbors in her local Cabbagetown community to major national corporations.  In addition to churches, homes, hotels, and hospitals, Susan has created stained glass artwork for the Coca-Cola museum and Disney's Grand Californian Hotel.  Her pieces have been showcased in design magazines and in homes featured on HGTV.  Susan participates annually in the Arts and Crafts Conference in Asheville, NC.

Susan comes from an artistic family.  She can't remember a time when she wasn't drawing.  Her drawing skills led to a career in architectural rendering.  When a computer program called CAD took over much of the work traditionally performed by humans in the architectural business, Susan decided to shift her focus from architectural rendering to design.  Her first design project was for a client's stained-glass window.  Intrigued by this old world art form, Susan decided to learn how the finished product was created.  She signed up for classes at a local glass studio, a quick-study, Susan was soon after hired by that same studio as a designer.  After working as a designer with this company for ten years Susan decided, in 1994, to start her own company, Architectural Artworks.  The success of which can be viewed in a selection of her work posted in the gallery pages here on her website.   

Susan McCracken Artist & Designer

Susan McCracken Artist & Designer

Susan also creates jewelry and does glass fusing.  Fusing involves melting different textures and colors of glass together to create new forms.  It's a technique that blurs the lines between stained glass and painting.  She loves the places this technique takes her work, "working with patterns of color to create something that constantly changes in different light, and yet is made to last longer than most things is pretty amazing."